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Archive for the ‘UCMP news’ Category.

A whale of a find

The upper Miocene-Pliocene Purisima Formation near Capitola, California, is well known among avid fossil collectors and popular with beachcombers. While this seaside shallow marine deposit contains rich assemblages of clams, snails and other invertebrates, fossil vertebrates such as whales, fishes, and birds are the most prized. Happily this is a case in which amateurs and scientists have often partnered to exchange fossils and report findings. Fossil hunters Frank Perry, Stan Jarocki, and Bobby Boessenecker recently donated several important fossils from the Purisima Formation to the UCMP: a five-million-year-old whale skull and two ear bones from dolphin-like marine mammals. Descriptions of these fossils were published in the journal Acta Paleontologica Polonica as reported by the San Francisco Chronicle.

Understanding Science is now in Portuguese

Você fala português? If so, you’ll be pleased to learn about Understanding Science’s new Portuguese translation, led by Unversidade de Lisboa Principal Researcher Nuno P. Barradas and his team. Nuno and colleagues recently promoted Understanding Science in Portuguese at a community science event in the town of Estremoz, east of Lisbon. Science on the Streets was organized by Portugal’s national agency for public awareness of science, Ciência Viva ("Living Science"), and the Understanding Science flowchart featured prominently in the display!

Science on the Streets

Nuno P. Barradas (left) promoting Understanding Science at the Science in the Streets event in Estremoz, east of Lisbon, Portugal. Photo courtesy of Nuno P. Barradas.

Barnosky interviewed about climate change

global changeTony Barnosky, UCMP Curator and Professor of Integrative Biology, discussed a consensus statement to world leaders regarding global change, Maintaining Humanity's Life Support Systems in the 21st Century, this past week in an interview by KQED Science Editor Craig Miller.

Barnosky has been working with the California Office of the Governor to promote science-based solutions to global change problems. With 15 other global change scientists he developed the scientific consensus statement, which has now found its way into a number of state, national, and international discussions about environmental solutions. Since the release of the statement in May, more than 1,000 scientists around the world have endorsed it. Join the scientists and add your name as an endorser of the statement.

Engaging the next generation of geoscientists

Most Earth scientists have vivid memories of their first geological field trip, but how many can say their first experience was as a high school student on a trip led by 15 professors, professional scientists, and college students?

Thirty lucky students from the Bay Area, El Paso, and New Orleans were selected to participate in a ten-day, geology-of-California field trip that started along the San Andreas Fault at Pt. Reyes National Seashore and ended at Yosemite National Park. Led by UCMP Assistant Director Lisa White as part of the METALS (Minority Education Through Traveling and Learning in the Sciences) program, the trip was supported by an NSF collaborative grant between San Francisco State University, University of Texas El Paso, and the University of New Orleans. High school students recruited from each of the participating cities came together on June 10-20, 2013, for a fast-paced field trip led by faculty, graduate students, and educators associated with those universities.

At Pt. Reyes visitor center

Lisa White (second from left) with students at the Pt. Reyes National Seashore visitor center.

At Tomales Bay

Students on their way to see exposures of invertebrate fossils along Tomales Bay, east of Inverness ridge.

Lisa said, "Having directed the program for four years, my expectations for the student participants grow higher each year, and I am never disappointed. We create opportunities for the students to not only learn in a field setting but also to compete for awards by demonstrating an understanding of key concepts, making rock and fossil identifications, and producing outstanding field interpretations. The students, many of whom have spent little time outdoors or at the coast or in the mountains, have fun testing their endurance and enjoying learning in a natural setting."

The overriding goal of the METALS program is to raise awareness about the geosciences and to increase the numbers and diversity of students choosing academic paths in geoscience and related careers. What better way to showcase Earth science than through fun and exciting field work?

Snow at Lassen

The students enjoyed the snow they found at Mt. Lassen.

Group photo

The trip participants posed for this group photo at Mt. Lassen. All the photos in this post are courtesy of Lisa White.

Fossil bridging with the Girl Scouts

What Bay Area event brings together 5,000 eager girls, 50 exhibitors and a walk across the Golden Gate Bridge? Girl Scout Bridging! On Saturday, May 11, Lisa White, UCMP Director of Education and Public Programs, and Erica Clites, Museum Scientist, attended the annual Girl Scout event at Crissy Field in the Presidio of San Francisco. The Bridging is a symbolic event recognizing the transition from the Junior level of Girl Scouting to Cadette, and the girls — representing troops throughout the western states — still had plenty of energy to learn about the history of life and engage with fossils following their bridge walk!

At the UCMP table

Lisa White and Erica Clites are ready for those Girl Scouts. Note the Golden Gate Bridge in the background, partially concealed by fog.

Erica and Girl Scouts

Erica shows interested Girl Scouts a mammoth tusk and other fossils found in the Bay Area. Both photos courtesy of Lisa White.

Marshall shows terrestrial mammal extinction due to Red Queen with new work published in Science

By studying 19 groups of Cenozoic mammals Charles Marshall and Tiago Quental tested and confirmed the Red Queen hypothesis. Red Queen is the hypothesis that states that groups must continue to adapt and evolve in response to their environments in order to survive. It's not just extinction events that threaten groups--it's also low rates of origination of new species. The new research (published in Science) shows that these mammal groups have experienced diversity declines in part due to their failure to keep pace with their deteriorating environments.

Read the UC Berkeley News Center story about this work.

Read the Science paper.

Warmer climates can lead to big lizards

A mounted modern lizard alongside the fossil jaw bones.

Pat Holroyd and co-authors describe a new species of giant lizard in the latest issue of Proceedings of the Royal Society B. The fossil jaw bones of this lizard have been in the UCMP collection since the 1970s, but it took a while for them to be recognized as something special. The specimens are from an herbivorous lizard that lived in the warm climate of Asia 40 million years ago. Dubbed Barbaturex morrisoni, this lizard was much bigger than the largest herbivorous lizards alive today. The unique traits of this lizard indicate that a warmer climate may have enabled gigantism via increased floral productivity and metabolic rates.

 

Read the press release at the UC Berkeley Newscenter.

 

Read the full paper at Proceedings of the Royal Society B.

Werning blogs at PLOS about the fossils of the Sierra Nevada

In her latest post over at the Public Library of Science blog The Integrative Paleontologists Sarah Werning writes about about what the fossil history of California can teach us about climate change. UCMP is teaming up with other Berkeley natural history museums on the Berkeley Initiative in Global Change Biology to strive for a comprehensive picture of the effects of climate change on past, present, and future life.

Read Sarah's post here.

UCMP students honored with 2013 Paleontological Society Student Grants Awards

Dori Contreras (Looy Lab), Renske Kirchholtes (Looy Lab), and Allison Stegner (Barnosky Lab) will each receive awards from The Paleontological Society to support their research. Each year the Society grants Mid-America Paleontology Society (MAPS) Outstanding Research Awards to the top three student proposals received and honors a student with the G. Arthur Cooper Award for student research.

Dori, Renske, and Allison

Dori Contreras (left), Renske Kirchholtes (center), and Allison Stegner (right) busy at UCMP's Cal Day open house.
 

Dori Contreras will receive a MAPS Outstanding Student Research Award to support her research titled: Investigating the evolution of tropical rainforests: A functional analysis of the late Cretaceous Jose Creek Member, McRae Fm.

Renske Kirchholtes will receive a MAPS Outstanding Student Research Award to support of her research titled: Phytoliths: a novel application to answering ancient questions.

Allison Stegner will receive the G. Arthur Cooper Award to support her research titled: Assessing small mammal response to Quaternary climate and land use change on the Colorado Plateau.

Barnosky presents statement on global environmental problems to Governor Brown

When California governor Jerry Brown challenged scientists to put global change issues into terms that political leaders can understand UCMP's Tony Barnosky stepped up. On May 23 Barnosky and colleagues presented a 30-page statement entitled Maintaining Humanity’s Life Support Systems in the 21st Century to the governor. It's a strong statement about global environmental problems and what people must do to insure the future health of the planet with signatories from 44 countries including two Nobel laureates, 33 members of the U.S. National Academy of Sciences and members of other nations' scientific academies.

 

Read more about Barnosky and other scientists' presentation to the governor at the UC Berkeley News Center.

 

Read the scientific consensus statement at the Millenium Alliance for Humanity & the Biosphere website.