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Bringing the field to our users through EPICC’s Virtual Field Experiences

Ever wonder where fossils from the UCMP were collected or want to know more about the geological setting of UCMP field areas? Curious about why an area looks the way it does?

These questions and others are driving the development of Virtual Field Experiences (VFEs) associated with the EPICC project (Eastern Pacific Invertebrate Communities of the Cenozoic, http://epicc.berkeley.edu). Together with EPICC partners from the Paleontological Research Institution (PRI), UCMP Assistant Director Lisa White and Museum Scientist Erica Clites joined Robert Ross (PRI Associate Director for Outreach) and Don Duggan-Haas (PRI Director of Teacher Programming) to document field areas along the west coast serving as the basis for Cenozoic invertebrate fossil collections that are being digitized with support from the National Science Foundation (as part of the Advancing Digitization of Biological Collections program).

The EPICC partnership with nine natural history museums focuses on Cenozoic fossils found in the eastern Pacific. Within California, fossils from the Kettleman Hills in the Central Valley of California and fossils along the Pacific coast will be part of a series of VFEs designed to document and capture the field to museum connection. These connections provide an opportunity for our users to explore the geological backdrop of our Cenozoic invertebrate collections and learn how fossils are described and interpreted.

As a preview of the VFEs, which will go live in late spring, follow us into the field as we document fossils in context, highlight sedimentological features, and describe unique structures in the Purisima Formation along the California coast. During several days in March 2017, the UCMP and PRI team went to key locations along Capitola Beach (Santa Cruz County) and Moss Beach (San Mateo County) to photograph rocks and fossils, and videotape the team at work.

The primary goal of the VFEs is to show how paleontological field work and fossil data collection are done.

In these series of photographs taken at Moss Beach (the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve), view the team at work, capturing and documenting the source of some EPICC fossil collections.

 

EPICC_MossBeach_454

The team crosses a rocky stretch of beach in to inspect which sections of the Purisima Formation would be ideal for photography. At low tide, most visitors to the Fitzgerald Marine Reserve go to enjoy the tide pools and the organisms of the rocky intertidal zone.

Purisima formation

The team begins setting up at one of the Purisima Formation outcrops.

Bivalves in outcrop

The Purisima Formation, between 3-7 million years old, contains an array of fossil bivalves and other invertebrates. Here, among the shell fragments, is a fossil bivalve shown in life position in this cross sectional view.

Set up for filming the videos

Videographer, John Tegan setting up the shot with Rob and Lisa to discuss key features of the landscape.

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Don scanning the outcrop and capturing images in 3D.

Erica, for scale, describing some different textural features in beds of the Purisima Formation.

Erica, for scale, describing some different textural features in beds of the Purisima Formation.

Beds of the Purisima Formation are folded into a plunging syncline. UCMP Staff Assistant Lillian Pearson hops across for a better view.

Beds of the Purisima Formation are folded into a plunging syncline. UCMP Staff Assistant Lillian Pearson hops across for a better view.

Some of the shells are concentrated into highly fossiliferous sandstone and conglomerate beds, dense with fragments of bivalve and gastropod shells, with occasional echinoids and other fossils. The shells are highly fragmented and are embedded in pebble conglomerate suggesting these may be storm beds.

Some of the shells are concentrated into highly fossiliferous sandstone and conglomerate beds, dense with fragments of bivalve and gastropod shells, with occasional echinoids and other fossils. The shells are highly fragmented and are embedded in pebble conglomerate suggesting these may be storm beds.

 

Making these experiences more accessible.

UCMP and the Paleontological Research Institute will keep working together with all the EPICC partners to bring paleontological and geological experiences to the classroom through these virtual field experiences. We are enthusiastic about offering these educational tools and sharing the stunning geology of California and the west coast. We think the VFE will be especially helpful for communities who don't have ready access to outdoor spaces.

Once these VFEs are completed, they will be shared on the EPICC website. www.epicc.berkeley.edu